75 years on

This is the place for posts that don't fit into any other category.

Moderator: RichardW

User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 15856
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 1587

75 years on

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Have to say I have been enjoying the BBC Coverage so far of the D-Day 75th Anniversary commemoration.

Interesting stories from the few left who were there, and for me anyway a bit of detail I never knew before. Particularly the coverage of the Mulberry Harbours.
screenshot
screenshot
Took the trouble to read more about them on wiki. Quite staggering.

Regards Neil

User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 15856
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 1587

Re: 75 years on

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Remnants of Mulberry Harbour components can still be seen in several locations around the coast of Britain.

Mulberry Caisson Remains, Aldwick Beach
Image

© Copyright Simon Carey and
licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Regards Neil

User avatar
bobins
Donor 2021
Posts: 4042
Joined: 05 Jul 2012, 18:07
x 1228

Re: 75 years on

Post by bobins »

A bit of history and some good photos can be found here:
https://mulberryrelicbognor.weebly.com/

although technically it's part of a 'Beetle' pontoon.

User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 15856
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 1587

Re: 75 years on

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Not all on the South-East/South Coast here's a "Beetle" Pontoon near Garlieston, Dumfries And Galloway, South West Scotland

A beetle Pontoon
Image

© Copyright Andrew Taylor and
licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

REgards Neil
Last edited by NewcastleFalcon on 05 Jun 2019, 21:25, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
bobins
Donor 2021
Posts: 4042
Joined: 05 Jul 2012, 18:07
x 1228

Re: 75 years on

Post by bobins »

...not a lot of people know this......

" 'Mulberry' and the names of all the (D-Day) beaches were words appearing in the Daily Telegraph crossword puzzle in the month prior to the invasion. The crossword compilers, Melville Jones and Leonard Dawe, were questioned by MI5, which determined the appearance of the words was innocent. However, over 60 years later, a former student reported that Dawe frequently requested words from his students, many of whom were children in the same area as US military personnel."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mulberry_harbour

User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 15856
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 1587

Re: 75 years on

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Wiki even has a page on the Telegraph Crosswords under suspicion
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-Day_Dai ... rity_alarm

The run of D-Day codewords as Daily Telegraph crossword solutions continued:

2 May 1944: 'Utah' (17 across, clued as "One of the U.S."): code name for the D-Day beach assigned to the US 4th Infantry Division (Utah Beach). This would have been treated as another coincidence.
22 May 1944: 'Omaha' (3 down, clued as "Red Indian on the Missouri"): code name for the D-Day beach to be taken by the US 1st Infantry Division (Omaha Beach).
27 May 1944: 'Overlord' (11 across, clued as "[common]... but some bigwig like this has stolen some of it at times.", code name for the whole D-Day operation: Operation Overlord)
30 May 1944: 'Mulberry' (11 across, clued as "This bush is a centre of nursery revolutions.", Mulberry harbour)

Regards Neil

Homer
Posts: 1504
Joined: 26 Feb 2003, 11:52
x 14

Re: 75 years on

Post by Homer »

NewcastleFalcon wrote:
05 Jun 2019, 21:22
Not all on the South-East/South Coast here's a "Beetle" Pontoon near Garlieston, Dumfries And Galloway, South West Scotland


There's a few here, which can be seen on Google maps satellite view. Amazing things up close.

User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 15856
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 1587

Re: 75 years on

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Mulberry Harbour Prototype
Image

© Copyright Andrew Taylor and
licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Did wonder why there were remnants so far north but this little piece from Geograph gives an explanation.
Mulberry Harbour Prototype
Remains of a Mulberry Harbour Prototype (floating harbours used during the 2nd World War D-Day landings) pictured at an extremely low tide. The floating harbours were tested in this area of South Scotland as the tides rise and fall hugely like on the North of France. The structure collapsed during a storm on March 16th, 2006 making this probably the last image of it seen standing. The base concrete blocks are still visible at low tides. For the first time in over 50 years this sight will not welcome visitors to Rigg (Cruggleton) Bay.
Regards Neil

User avatar
Stickyfinger
Donor 2016
Posts: 10006
Joined: 28 Mar 2013, 22:05
x 735

Re: 75 years on

Post by Stickyfinger »

Bloody MAGNIFICAT Men.

User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 15856
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 1587

Re: 75 years on

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

One of the things I am liking about the coverage is the taking of time to speak to the veterans and let them tell their story.

One lovely bit of humour I liked was from one of the 2 paratroopers both over 90 who did tandem jumps today in Normandy.
He spoke in a lovely clear Scottish accent...just after landing today
"You must realise that Harry and I both jumped into Normandy during the war So this was a reincarnation of it. Quite enjoyable too..... My wife's not very well, so I took a chance and nipped out the back door this morning and here I am!"
screenshot
screenshot
Regards Neil