Xantia 110 Hdi Clutch Replacement

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onthecut
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Xantia 110 Hdi Clutch Replacement

Post by onthecut » 02 Sep 2014, 22:20

I looked for a simple answer before starting and couldn't find one ---- so here it is. Yes, you can get the gearbox out in situ on the 110 Hdi ---- but it's tight.

It's definitely not a job to do if you haven't tackled something similar before, or if you can't find another pair (or preferably two pairs) of hands to help.

If you can't work out the basic odds and sods to get out of the way, don't start. The key items we had as follows: Air filter box, battery tray and extension and fluid reservoir all out. Pressure regulator assembly unbolted and end stay removed. (No need to interrupt any pipework, just carefully manoeuvre out of the way, as required) Both drive shafts out. ABS block support bracket out (again, no need to interrupt any pipework -- the ABS box floated about quite happily on its many pipes). Starter motor undone, left hanging about. LH top engine mounting and mounting plate removed. Corresponding bracket removed from top of box.
On the box itself, undo / remove the gearchange cables and bracket; speedo sender, crank position sensor and reverse lamp cable. The slave cylinder is a bayonet fit. Push in slightly and it's then a very firm twist anti clockwise, about 90 deg.to undo and withdraw. Again, no need to interrupt any pipework and there is enough slack in the feed pipe to allow the cylinder to sit on the wheel housing, out of the way during the rest of the job.

Arrange a decent, adjustable jack under the flywheel end of the engine -- we used a V notched piece of wood under the sump for better control. Once you have removed the rest of the bellhousing bolts and the flywheel lower guard, it's time to start drawing the box away from the engine. Ideally, you want to keep it as in line as possible, but in reality, you will wind up wrestling with it. The biggest impediment to smooth withdrawal is the bulk of the diff housing coming against the subframe, but potentially, also, the continued engagement of the release bearing in the clutch cover. With the box drawn as far back as possible, but still as straight as possible, you should be able to undo the clutch cover retaining bolts; although it makes the box that bit heavier, it gets around the issue of having to disengage the release bearing in situ. The final stage of removal is now to rotate the box anti clock wise and generally shuffle it and the engine orientation about, such that you get the diff housing clear of the subframe and chassis leg ---- and that's it --- box out !! Be prepared -- it's heavier than the earlier boxes.

It's a sod of a job, so don't skimp on the replacement parts. We used a Valeo kit which came in a bit over £100. Make absolutely sure there is no impediment to free movement of the new disc on the input shaft splines. For reassembly, use a suitable tool to centralise the new disc and it's then that three pairs of hands and eyes are most valuable --- someone to support the bulk of the weight from below; someone below to watch how its going and twist and turn as required and someone doing the same from the top. Obviously, you want it going in as square as possible. If you can't quite get it started, rotate the flywheel slightly to encourage spline alignment. It will be self evident when it engages properly. Before offering the box up, make sure you have engaged the release bearing with its yoke. Once installed, you will need some means to smartly pull outward the release arm, to engage the bearing with the cover.

As Mr Haynes would say, reassembly is then the reverse of dismantling. Good time to renew the diff output seals while the box is out. We drained the box prior to removal and then refilled it through the reverse lamp switch aoerture. Put in two litres, but to be honest, took a guess at quantity.

The above is not an exhaustive description, but hpefully some help if you are weighing up the pros and cons of the job.

Mike.

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CitroJim
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Re: Xantia 110 Hdi Clutch Replacement

Post by CitroJim » 03 Sep 2014, 04:40

Well done Mike :-D As a veteran of several ML5 clutch changes in 110 HDi and Activas I know exactly what you were up against.

Thanks for posting up your experiences as it is most helpful for others contemplating this quite difficult job.

Indeed, the ML5 is a heavy box indeed. I normally use an engine crane on it but thankfully there's no need to completely remove the 'box.

Your next challenge - a clutch change on a 2.5TD XM :lol: :lol: :lol:

steelcityuk
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Re: Xantia 110 Hdi Clutch Replacement

Post by steelcityuk » 03 Sep 2014, 08:50

Sounds a pig of a job and as you say use quality parts. The worst I've tackled was a CSC (slave cylinder) on a Scenic 1.9 dCi FAP. Usual stripping down, front off, rads off, drive shafts out, both parts of the subframe off (which means steering rack and dpf parts off) plus all sorts of other bits and bobs. Oh yes the six speed box was rather heavy too...

Steve.

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CitroJim
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Re: Xantia 110 Hdi Clutch Replacement

Post by CitroJim » 03 Sep 2014, 09:34

steelcityuk wrote: and as you say use quality parts.
Absolutely yes Steve. It's a definite false economy to use cheap clutches. As I have experience of in a 1.9TD :evil:

onthecut
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Re: Xantia 110 Hdi Clutch Replacement

Post by onthecut » 04 Sep 2014, 08:12

CitroJim wrote:
Your next challenge - a clutch change on a 2.5TD XM :lol: :lol: :lol:
Been there, done that ! Mind, I did pull the lot out for that and took the opportunity to do the cam belt and various other odds and sods at the same time. Given the time consuming nature of these clutch jobs, it would be much more reassuring to find a nice, meaty 10" disc, rather than the spindly looking things they fit, although to be fair, I suppose they last quite well.

Have to say, my least favourite job of all on the various Cits I've had is doing the head gasket, in situ, on the 2.1 XM. Unfortunately, had to do more than one, as well. Strangely, mind -- I just did an oil change on daughter's late 207 1.6Hdi and the engine bay in that makes the XM or Xantia look like they have acres of spare room. Just acquired a 136 facelift C5 and have to say I am impressed with the engine installation in that. It looks like they actually have given some thought to some issues of accessibility. Not impressed with some of the interior plastic, which looks junk compared to the Xantia.

Mike.

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Re: Xantia 110 Hdi Clutch Replacement

Post by CitroJim » 04 Sep 2014, 09:05

onthecut wrote:
CitroJim wrote:
Your next challenge - a clutch change on a 2.5TD XM :lol: :lol: :lol:
Been there, done that !
Mike, you have now met the entry requirements to join Team WFA!

Welcome aboard as an honorary member =D> :-D