Older Tractors - Any Experience?

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addo
Sara Watson's Stalker
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Older Tractors - Any Experience?

Post by addo »

I'm looking at buying a "small" old-school tractor for slashing/mowing of my paddock. Subletting the work is showing up as just too dear.

Stuff like the Grey Fergies come up, often with a four foot slasher included. Wondering if anyone here has worked on this era of equipment, much. A few concerns I have, generally involve the mechanical side of things:

1. Clutches of this era - wet or dry? Do you renew the linings and resurface the PP/flywheel or are kits sold now?
2. Diesels - good or bad for durability? What wears or breaks in an old school NA diesel?
3. Petrols - wet sleeves or integral bores? Are they readily enough swapped over to 12V neg ground?

Any other wear and tear or unexpected cost type things I may have overlooked?

Thanks, Adam.

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spider
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Re: Older Tractors - Any Experience?

Post by spider »

It's a shame my (late) father is not around as he could of answered this for sure with a lot of details. :( As its partly what he did for 40+ years, both in the workshop and out "in the field" so to speak, doing repairs on site.

addo
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Post by addo »

A little surfing is giving some pointers; you can get friction discs rather than relining kits for the clutch, seems you don't re-ring the motors, but fit new barrels.

KP
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Re: Older Tractors - Any Experience?

Post by KP »

Ex FIL had an MF35.

He got rid when it siezed solid.

Reason why. Just like his daughter he was as thick as pig iron.

He had it 25years and never serviced it. Diff/box/engine nothing.

It only got a coolant change when the radiator holed 10years after buying it.

it was a strong work horse for 5years that i knew it until the final day but if it was me i'd buy one with as little hours as possible and flush its guts out. They are very torquey and robust if cared for. The simpler the unit you go for the better.

I bet it would have done another 50+ years if it had been looked after as it just pootled up and down a nursery so wasn't strained a lot bar its hydraulics which kept popping as he never changed the filter on it and it was surely disintegrated.

don't forget they are more often than not RWD as well :)

Grease up every joint you can on a yearly basis and if possible use dust covers on them where you are this should help stop small grit getting in and destroying them.

Engine blocks will hardly ever be clean. Degrease it and keep it clean, it makes it easier to look after it and looks so much better for such little work! a good option is a paint sprayer (hand pump type one) and acetone or petrol and let it soak for a bit, avoiding rubber parts of course! and then rinse off with a jet wash :)

ausxm
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Joined: 25 Jul 2010, 13:57

Re: Older Tractors - Any Experience?

Post by ausxm »

addo wrote:I'm looking at buying a "small" old-school tractor for slashing/mowing of my paddock. Subletting the work is showing up as just too dear.

Stuff like the Grey Fergies come up, often with a four foot slasher included. Wondering if anyone here has worked on this era of equipment, much. A few concerns I have, generally involve the mechanical side of things:

1. Clutches of this era - wet or dry? Do you renew the linings and resurface the PP/flywheel or are kits sold now?
2. Diesels - good or bad for durability? What wears or breaks in an old school NA diesel?
3. Petrols - wet sleeves or integral bores? Are they readily enough swapped over to 12V neg ground?

Any other wear and tear or unexpected cost type things I may have overlooked?

Thanks, Adam.
personally adam, i would just go for a ex council kabota, bullet proof.
operated too many old grey fergies to never see another one.
do not buy a chinese tractor,you will think a citroen is the best built thing ever after that