Storage of injection pumps

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spider
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Storage of injection pumps

Post by spider »

Maybe this is one for Jim ? ;)

As thread title really, I was wondering what the best sensible way of storing these was ?

I'm thinking of scrapyard retrievals really. I plan to grab one or two while I can but not sure about storage.

Should it be dry stored ? (logic seems to suggest not, in my mind it should be kept full of fuel) , although fuel does go off after a time :?:

Another thought was to submerge them (completely!) in fuel then allow the excess to drain off, cap all the apertures and seal it up in a bag (freezer type plastic bag possibly), although that would soak parts (seals around control arms) in fuel in the process.

I'm probably confusing myself :D , just wondered on peoples thoughts really.
dnsey
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Post by dnsey »

I suppose that ideally you'd store it filled with fuel with fuel stabiliser added.
In practice, I think I'd add a bit of 2-stroke oil to some fuel, and flush the pump through, with the idea of depositing a small amount of oil on all surfaces as corrosion protection.
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Xaccers
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Post by Xaccers »

I'd fill it with LHM.
Diesel goes off after time doesn't it?
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spider
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Post by spider »

dnsey wrote:I suppose that ideally you'd store it filled with fuel with fuel stabiliser added.
In practice, I think I'd add a bit of 2-stroke oil to some fuel, and flush the pump through, with the idea of depositing a small amount of oil on all surfaces as corrosion protection.
Two stroke oil sounds sensible mixed in with some fuel. Obviously yes, a light coating of machine oil (not WD40) on the outside is a sensible thought. I thought about the 3-in-1 oil and just giving it a gentle coating of that with a rag to areas prone to corrosion.
Xac wrote:I'd fill it with LHM.
Diesel goes off after time doesn't it?
Yes, as far as I know it solidifies or otherwise can cause damage over a long period. I think the other question here is 'how' long is safe ? , I know a few months is fine...
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Xaccers
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Post by Xaccers »

6th months for safe storage.
There's the risk of algae growth with diesel, don't know how bad that would actully be in just a pump though.
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myglaren
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Post by myglaren »

I think that filled with and submerged in LHM in a sealed container would do it.
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CitroJim
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Post by CitroJim »

myglaren wrote:I think that filled with and submerged in LHM in a sealed container would do it.
Certainly filled with LHM will do it, no need to submerge it though :lol: Just bung all the orifices with the pukka Bosch plugs and it'll store for ever.

Diesel will go "off" after a while and turn to brown gum and sludge. Veg oil will go rancid and turn very sticky and smelly.

I'd recommend, Andy, that any scrapyard retrieval is given a quick once-over before going back into service unless you know it has run recently.

To store, set up a small header tank of LHM and with the stop solenoid energised, spin it over by hand until LHM runs out of he return and is shooting out of the delivery valves. You know then all the old fuel is out and replaced by LHM.

Using hydraflush* instead of LHM might do a good job of cleaning a pump too...


*Hydraflush is a fluid used to clean dirty Citroen hydraulic systems. It fully replaces the LHM for 1,000 to 1,500 miles and is then drained, along with all the muck, before the system is refilled with fresh LHM.
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DickieG
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Post by DickieG »

I know we're talking Citroens here but I take it normal engine oil rather than LHM will do?
HDI Dave
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Post by HDI Dave »

DickieG wrote:I know we're talking Citroëns here but I take it normal engine oil rather than LHM will do?
That's what I was thinking,

being a relative citnoob I don't know the magical powers of LHM,

As Dick says,
1./ Why not just use engine oil,thin grade,etc,

2./ Why would LHM be better?

3./ Not even being a tightwad,as LHM is dearer...just curious as to why LHM is better than oil :)
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spider
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Post by spider »

I can only assume LHM vs oil , perhaps LHM is less likely to attack any vulnerable parts such as seals ? (I'm just thinking here of oil vs rubber)

Thanks for comments so far. I am not sure how long the pump I aquire will have stood for, I would estimate a month or three, no longer. Obviously, I'll avoid anything that looks like its suffering from effects of moisture / damp (easy clues are things like open fuel filters etc I would say)

Just thinking I could do with a spare while they are relatively easy to obtain really.

Good tip regarding running it through, I had planned to remove stop solenoid and refit without internals and then feed it fuel, turning it slowly (keeping a rag over outlet ports and facing away from me!) until fresh fuel appeared, something like that anyway. :)
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Xaccers
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Post by Xaccers »

Forget about seals being eaten, if you're fitting a 2nd hand pump, then get a new set of seals ready and waiting to fit just before you need to swap pumps.
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spider
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Post by spider »

Xac wrote:Forget about seals being eaten, if you're fitting a 2nd hand pump, then get a new set of seals ready and waiting to fit just before you need to swap pumps.
That's so obvious I had not even thought of it :oops: , I'm having one of those days here. :)

I was just thinking to myself, at least I can have a leisurely hour or so de-amouring it (if needed) without any rush.