Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

This is the place for posts that don't fit into any other category.

Moderator: RichardW

User avatar
Paul-R
(Donor 2020)
Posts: 5682
Joined: 07 May 2009, 16:24
x 881

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by Paul-R »

The village of Goathland in North Yorkshire / North Riding. Better known to the great unwashed as Aidensfield in the TV series Heartbeat.
IMG_0857.JPG
IMG_0862.JPG
IMG_0871.JPG
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

There can be more than one offering or selection as personal pub of the day, and Mick may well like to repeat his when he inadvertently selected a pub on Lancashire's day in the spotlight, with a Lancashire ale, Lancashire postcode but which is firmly and always has been in Yorkshire, the Game Cock at Austwick. A large chunk of the West end of the Yorkshire Dales has LA2 postcodes.

My selection is for the Moorcock Inn, although I have many Original Pictures of the Tan Hill Inn, which could have been a contender.
Image
The Moorcock Inn appears on this sign 9½ Miles from Nateby. In those 9½ Miles the B6270 it climbs up and over into the Yorkshire Dales, and at a point on that road, Westmorland turns into The West Riding of Yorkshire or did, now Cumbria turns into North Yorkshire and "Richmondshire" which appears to have branded itself thus.

Yorkshire, England is on the Outskirts of it.
Image

© Copyright Martin Dawes and
licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Here is the Moorcock

https://www.moorcockinngarsdale.com/
The Moorcock
Image

© Copyright John Illingworth and
licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Regards Neil

PS What a great choice...its shut on a Monday :!:
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

If you are partial to a good pork pie there are at least two establishments in Skipton vying to be the best, and reasonable enough too.
NewcastleFalcon wrote:
19 Nov 2021, 23:02
Skipton

You have two choices for the world's best Pork Pies, and following Country House Gent's recommendation from "Journeys by Narrowboat", Stanforths gets the nod from me, piping hot, and oozing "juice". Drake and Macefield also came well recommended by the locals, but Stanforth's got the nod today.


Image

Image

REgards Neil
Regards Neil
User avatar
myglaren
Forum Admin Team
Posts: 21411
Joined: 02 Mar 2008, 14:30
x 2012

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by myglaren »

Not relevant but awakened a memory with Stanforths.
I went to three schools, primary, middle and secondary.
In the middle school we had a joker in the class, Tommy Stanforth. He was as usual making a nuisance of himself when the teacher said loudly

"Stand forth, Stanforth, and stop this tomfoolery" and made him stand at the front of the class for the rest of the lesson. Much to everyone's amusement.
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Things to look out for as you drive through the major road routes of Yorkshire.

If you are coming down the A1 from Durham, in former times this would have been an Icon. Now you can hardly see it.

Memorable Roadside Sights (Yorkshire main Road Routes) No 1. The Scotch Corner Hotel.
Roadscapes II Book<br />Alan Spillett
Roadscapes II Book
Alan Spillett
Regards Neil
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Things to look out for as you drive through the major road routes of Yorkshire.

Memorable Roadside Sights (Yorkshire main Road Routes) No 2. Ferrybridge Power Station (before demolition).



Regards Neil
User avatar
bobins
Donor 2021
Posts: 4412
Joined: 05 Jul 2012, 18:07
x 1462

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by bobins »

The tallest free standing structure in the UK*

*-That isn't one of the other tallest structures

Image
EmleyMoorMastSpring2006
Alan Zomerfeld, CC BY-SA 2.5 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5>, via Wikimedia Commons

It is made up of a 1,084 ft (330.4 m) concrete tower and apparatus that began to transmit in 1971. It is protected under UK law as a Grade II listed building. It is the tallest freestanding structure in the United Kingdom, and 24th tallest tower in the world. It was the seventh tallest freestanding structure and was fourth tallest tower in the European Union before Brexit. When built it was the sixth tallest freestanding structure in the world after the Ostankino Tower, the Empire State Building, 875 North Michigan Avenue (known as The John Hancock Center), the Berliner Fernsehturm and Tokyo Tower.

The tower's current official name, The Arqiva Tower, is shown on a sign beside the offices at the base of the tower, but it is commonly known just as "Emley Moor".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emley_Moo ... ng_station
User avatar
bobins
Donor 2021
Posts: 4412
Joined: 05 Jul 2012, 18:07
x 1462

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by bobins »

Yorkshire Tea
Yorkshire Tea- Reddit
Yorkshire Tea- Reddit

"Yorkshire Tea is grown in more than 20 different places across Africa and India, then imported to Harrogate and blended – so why is it called 'Yorkshire Tea'?
If you drank one of those 20 teas on its own, it would typically be described in terms of its origin – Assam tea, for example, or Rwandan tea, Kenyan tea and so on.
But blends from multiple origins need to be named more creatively. Take 'Russian Caravan', for example – a famous blend of oolong, Keemun and Lapsang Souchong which made its way from China to Russia on 18th century camel caravans. It wasn’t very practical (or very catchy) to call it Oolong Keemun Lapsang Souchong, so instead it was named after its trade route.
In Britain, there's a more familiar example: English Breakfast.
English Breakfast tea was a mish-mash of the remainders of tea trader's various teas from around the world. They mixed them all together and sold them as a blend and there was no guarantee of consistency, quality, origin or flavour – but the product still needed a name. So it became the defining example of a blend named after the place it was created, and the market it was created for.
English Breakfast tea caught on – and its composition became a little more standardised and refined. Ultimately, it provided the inspiration for most of the black tea blends Brits drinks today. And the source of its name has passed into tea-making tradition too.
As Taylors of Harrogate, we've been creating tea blends in our North Yorkshire home since 1886. It's this blending that defines the art of the tea-maker. It’s a careful process which layers the complimentary flavours of individual teas on top of each other to build a more complex flavour, and a great blend can achieve a balance and depth which single origin teas can't, along with a taste profile which is uniquely its own.
In the early 20th century, when the water supply was less uniform than it is today, we used to make individual blends for each customer at our flagship store in Harrogate. And so, in the 1970s, we created a black tea blend specifically for the water supply in Yorkshire, and sold only in Yorkshire. in the great tradition of English Breakfast, we named it Yorkshire Tea.
Over the years, a fondness for our brew spread well beyond those regional borders – which is why it's now sold everywhere in the UK, and in lots of other countries too."
https://www.yorkshiretea.co.uk/brew-new ... kshire-tea
User avatar
myglaren
Forum Admin Team
Posts: 21411
Joined: 02 Mar 2008, 14:30
x 2012

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by myglaren »

Everyone knows that Yorkshire tea is grown on the sunny south facing slopes of Ilkley Moor.

Except when we need it in winter when it comes from the Barnsley tea mines.

All that stuff above is just PR smoke and mirrors.
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

I am pretty sure the Pennine Way Footbridge over the M62 is fully within the historic County of Yorkshire

Memorable Roadside Sights (Yorkshire main Road Routes) No 3/4. Pennine Way Footbridge over the M62
temp2.png
Regarda Neil
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Not the NYM railway but the NBR in Scarborough. Been going for generations, and enjoyed by the generations.
Small point the steam engine is fake! Its a diesel with a bit of artificially generated steam!
P1040164.JPG
P1040165.JPG
P1040166.JPG
Regards Neil
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

Yorkshire just about done,

On their Biennial visit to Harrogate, my Grandpa and Gran would always bring bag a tin of these...
Regards Neil
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

_________Yorkshire Done______________

What's Left :?: The 21 here
and-todays selection is.....
and-todays selection is.....
New county for Tuesday
17..........Glamorgan
REgards Neil
User avatar
mickthemaverick
Donor 2022
Posts: 9183
Joined: 11 May 2019, 17:56
x 2487

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by mickthemaverick »

The Glamorgan flag has a familiar ring about it for FCF members: :-D
BFTW
BFTW
How that happened is here

The location:
BFTW
BFTW
WalesGlamorganTrad.png (21.84 KiB) Viewed 45 times
And some place names:
BFTW
BFTW
User avatar
NewcastleFalcon
Posts: 19806
Joined: 25 Feb 2009, 11:40
x 2111

Re: Today's County in the Spotlight:Part 2

Post by NewcastleFalcon »

If you take the time and trouble to have a look at the inks to origins of the County Flags, the care and research undertaken to come up with them is remarkable, Glamorgan's being a case in point, a well justified design for the County flag officially registered in 2013.

Glamorgan immediately brings to mind a couple of things, the Prifysgol Caerdydd, and a cricket match between Glamorgan and Kent in the 1970's at Swansea.

Not having noticed previous to today up pops, the adopted flag design from the Uni's coat of arms.
Image
Glamorgan County Cricket look like they have stuck with the daffodil, maybe something to do with their Sophia Gardens Home.
Image
Regards Neil