After two americans and one japanese, now my car is a french one :)

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joydivision
Donor 2021
Posts: 49
Joined: 20 Jun 2021, 11:31
x 9

Re: After two americans and one japanese, now my car is a french one :)

Post by joydivision »

Thanks for the hints. I haven't checked the leak off pipes, but there's no diesel smell at all in engine compartment (from what I read on the internet, when people have this problem, they usually notice some diesel in the proximity of these pipes), so I don't think they're the culprit.
Regarding the primer bulb: how can I check that it works fine? I didn't know that it could cause this problem, allowing fuel to run wrong way.
So, if I was to install the mechanical non-return valve, it can go directly before primer bulb? That's great news, as it is easily accessible, so I could even do it myself. Thanks!
joydivision
Donor 2021
Posts: 49
Joined: 20 Jun 2021, 11:31
x 9

Re: After two americans and one japanese, now my car is a french one :)

Post by joydivision »

Today we had some really BAD weather here, strong thunderstorm with terribly strong rain. The result: in just one hour, the whole town was flooded. In Spain, Isla Cristina, was even worse. Quite a few people lost their cars (or at least the motor). I had to take my son to school (or at least try), and immediately decided it would be best to take my wife's car, not my 406, as I've read the warning topic about floods related to this car. And it was still an adventure, but I made it, safe and sound, to school and back (in some places water was at least 30 cm deep). Then, I had a look at my car (as I knew from the last FIRST rain after summer, that the weather rubber seals of the passenger door were in bad shape) and was shocked to find the passenger foot area totally flooded (the picture isn't very good, but you can see the reflection), it had almost two centimetres of standing water. I removed the water with a small bucket and then dried the carpet with a sponge (tomorrow I'm going to repeat the operation of the sponge), so to avoid the worst regarding mold and corrosion. I then took the opportunity of the weather getting much better to investigate the causes. The first, obvious causes, were the weather rubbers of the door. They were ok - I had previously repaired one of them (it had a few cuts) with silicone, so that couldn't be the problem. But then I noticed that the door wasn't pressing against them when closed, there was a gap, that probably allowed all the water to come in. Probably door hinges or door itself, maybe even the result of some unknown accident in the past, we don't know. I then discovered something which worried me even more: some water dripping out of the middle console, where the ventilation out is located, in the foot area. As I was really worried, I decided to take off the cover for the pollen filter in the engine bay, but found the insides to be dry, at least of the ventilation. I found some water around it, though, and noticed that someone had previously applied black silicone around it (quite badly, btw), which was coming off, partially. I thought this could be relevant and went through all the trouble of removing the thing and applying new silicone, but I don't actually think the water went through there. Only then I noticed that one of the little supports of the pollen filter cover was broken (right side of the pic), and the cover was hanging low, making the rubber not being applied with force against the top. I also noticed that a screw was loose close to the wiper shaft, which holds in place the plastic part which goes against the base of the windshield. All this I managed to correct, tightening the screw and using some cable tie to hold the cover in place. Now, I'm not sure if this will avoid water comin in but at least it removed quite a few parasitic noises I had before!
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Then I went for the doors. I got myself some self-adhesive rubber for house doors/windows and applied the stuff around all relevant places. This means that the door is now pressing against the rubber, so no more rain should be able to come in. Let's wait for the next rain to see if it was a success. I know that these rubbers will probably start to come off after some months, or at least in the next summer with the heat, but all in all they cost me 4 euros, so I think it's not a problem if I have to repeat this every year - correct me if I'm wrong, but changing the door rubbers appears to be a much, much more difficult and expensive task...
Attached some photos of the result. The brown stuff even combines quite nicely visually with the false wood panels :lol:
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On a totally different note: I finished repair of the outside temperature sensor, for less than 2 euros - got a standard 3,3k NTC and soldered parallel two resistors which make 17,4k (as I learned from googling, this is what's fitted in the outside temperature sensor of PSA). I then installed this into a little slot I made in the plastic on the base plate of the mirror and soldered the wires to the original wires. Like this, I didn't have to go through the very risky (and difficult) process of taking the mirror apart only to install the damn sensor. It's quite well placed, maybe a little less well than the original one, as it sometimes ends up in full sun, but not under normal conditions. The values I get are fully convincing, although I obviously had no chance yet to see how it behaves in winter with really cold temperatures. But at least between 16 and 35 degrees, they are spot on.
With this repair I noticed that automatic climate control is now working well, before it would take a long time to react and often not use enough blower power, now it works fine within seconds. It definitely needs the outside temperature value as reference. Pics attached.
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fotota
New User
Posts: 1
Joined: 28 Mar 2022, 13:05

Re: After two americans and one japanese, now my car is a french one :)

Post by fotota »

When making the outdoor temperature sensor, I provided a standard 3.3k NTC, but could not provide two resistors in parallel making 17.4k. Can you give exact resistor values ​​or colors?
How did you connect the resistor to the ntc?
joydivision
Donor 2021
Posts: 49
Joined: 20 Jun 2021, 11:31
x 9

Re: After two americans and one japanese, now my car is a french one :)

Post by joydivision »

fotota wrote:
28 Mar 2022, 15:27
When making the outdoor temperature sensor, I provided a standard 3.3k NTC, but could not provide two resistors in parallel making 17.4k. Can you give exact resistor values ​​or colors?
How did you connect the resistor to the ntc?
The control unit expects a resistance of 17,4k in parallel to the standard 3,3k NTC.

As I didn't have this resistor (it's a non standard value, although you can probably find it within the 1% tolerance range series), I "made" it by soldering two standard resistors in parallel which I measured and chose according to the closest value. I don't remember the exact values, but you can experiment with the online calculator tools available and then measure with multimeter within, say, 10 units of the same resistor until you find the ones which are really close and give best value. Example tool: https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/tools/ ... alculator/
You could go for example with 82k and 22k, gives pretty close to 17,4k.
You just install these two with the ntc all three together in parallel. If you can get a 1% 17,4k resistor, you're even better off, obviously, and just install that single resistor in parallel with the ntc.

If you use resistors of standard values with 5% tolerance the solution is not perfect, as they will change slightly their resistance with thermal variation, but it's really enough, the values of temperature measured are totally convincing when compared to my wife's Toyota or even temperature indications on (some) signs of pharmacies, for example, as long as they are not in the sun. Btw, this is the only problem with the way I installed the sensor - it's now more sensitive to the influence of the sun compared to the original spot, which is totally below the mirror. There it still gets warmer if the mirror is fully in the sun, but probably not as warm as the spot where I installed the sensor. So, what I avoided in terms of work (and risk - although instructions are available on the net and it seems fairly simple, I've never opened these mirrors before, so I could have bad luck and break a mirror) is a compromise in terms of "immunity" against direct sun light. It still works fine for every day use, though, even in warmer weather, because the values are good as long as the mirror is not exposed directly to the sun.