C5 X7 LED Upgrade for HP19W Bend Lighting

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GiveMeABreak
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C5 X7 LED Upgrade for HP19W Bend Lighting

Post by GiveMeABreak » 22 Aug 2017, 18:42

I thought I would document the cornering / angular lighting upgrade for the C5 X7 with Bi-Directional Xenon Headlights, which use a Philips HP19W / PH19W 19 Watt bulb.

Please note this guide is not applicable to models fitted with standard Halogen headlamps, as these lamps use a standard H7 bulb.

This guide is for upgrading number 3 light in the following Xenon Directional Headlamp:

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  1. Sidelight
  2. Main / Dipped Beam Xenon D1S
  3. Cornering / Bend / Angular Light HP19W
  4. Daytime Running Lamp HP24W / or LED Strip for later models.
Why bother?
  • The HP19W (Part No: 6216 F7) bulb is very expensive to replace, currently £44.47 inc. VAT each.
  • When active, the colour is a horrible yellow / white and does nothing to compliment the Xenons or Side lights.
  • The light output is very poor when seen next to the other lights.
  • Finishes the lights off with a uniform colour in conjunction with the optional HP24W Daytime Running Lamp and Side Light LED upgrades.
What I used:
1 x pair CREE XBD LEDs - Note: These new XBD Cree LEDs have longer pins than the LEDs typically used in the HP24W upgrades. Getting this type will save you having to solder on extra bits of pin! I got mine from here:
XBD Cree LED

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1 x pair of 50 Watt 8 Ohm resistors (in a kit):

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4 Cable Bridge clips (usually supplied in the above resistor kit)
Heat shrink tubing

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Some wire protector tubing (optional):

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Soldering iron (optional if choosing to solder an additional length of wire to the resistors)
Long nose pliers
A small flat blade screwdriver
A sharp knife
A metal bracket for the battery side fitting
A small nut and bolt to fit the resistor to the bracket
A suitable rawplug and screw for the driver side fixing
The original PH19W bulb holders
Plenty of patience

Advanced Warning! Make sure you want to do this upgrade, as you will need to dismantle and likely break the original bulbs to complete this job, so no going back unless you want to buy 2 new bulbs!

Preliminary Work:

Remove the HP19W bulb holders:

  1. Remove the headlamp covers by removing the 2 push up trim clips, then pulling the remaining corner clip vertically up. Remove the angular lighting protective caps (marked ‘C’ - the ones nearest the wings)

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  2. Hold the bulb holder and carefully make a small twist (about 45°) counter-clockwise looking from behind the headlamp or clockwise looking from the front of the headlamp.
  3. Using a small flat blade screwdriver, gently lift off the plug securing tab on the holder to release the wiring plug from the bulb holder.
  4. For the passenger side on vehicles with the battery in the engine bay, I found it necessary to remove the battery in order to get better access. Remember to ensure you allow the car to sleep before disconnecting the battery. Turn the battery holding clamp anti clockwise, and lift the clamp out vertically. Now remove the battery (might be a good time to give it a top-up charge).

    Separating the Bulb from the holder:

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    Ultimately we need to extract the bulb, which is attached to the black (or grey) crown, which is then locked into the holder by 4 lugs, arrowed in yellow.

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  5. I found that it was easier to use a very small and thin flat blade screwdriver and firstly prise the crown lugs off arrowed in green whilst pulling the bulb up quite firmly. You should try and keep the bulb as vertical as possible so as not to break the pins prematurely. If they snap off, that’s ok as you’ll need to use the pliers to pull ALL the remaining pin out of the pin channels.

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  6. This should leave the crown attached to the holder:


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  7. Using the small flat blade screwdriver, carefully ease out the crown from the holder. There are 4 lugs holding this in. I found firm but careful leverage on one of the sides where the lugs are located was enough to pop it out. The lugs are directly to the left and right of the pin channels. Be careful not to damage the lugs as although we need to trim these down, they are needed to provide some support from the LED.

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  8. So you should be left with the holder (above) so you can dispose of the crown, which we no longer need:

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  9. Use the pliers to remove any residual pin from the pin channels so they are not blocked.
  10. Next we need to shave about a third to half off the inner lugs arrowed in yellow. I found a sharp craft knife worked well, allowing me to shave off small slivers. Be very careful with the new LED not to force the pins all the way down whilst you are trimming the lugs, or this will bend them apart and risk breaking them! Gently guide the pins in whilst not touching the LED chips - use the metal body of the bulb. Carry on shaving off the lugs until the LED is near-seated at the bottom of the holder as possible - but it may not fir fully flush, so don’t force it. The actual power plug socket will help to hold the bulb in when connected.
  11. When you are happy with the fit, look at the underside and check to make sure the pins are straight and lined up so they will plug into the power connector later.

    Back to the Car:
  12. When you remove the lamp cover, you will see that there is a small cutaway in the lamp housing. This is ideal for allowing the wires from the electrical bridging connectors that we will make later, to exit the housing.
  13. We need to make a small split in the lamp cover that will allow the resistor wires to pass from the housing cutaway and through the cap via the split. I would not make this too big, as you want to ensure that the covers prevent any crud from getting into the lamp units. You can always use a little Duck tape to ensure the cap stays in place if it is a bit too proud.

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    Here you can see the cutaway in the lamp housing, which with the split in the cover, works well when the cap is fitted:

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  14. So now it’s a matter of measuring some single core wire from each lamp and allowing enough to the fixing point for each side, without having too much slack to get in the way - which is why the tubing is a good idea to allow easier routing and fixing if needed.
  15. I found it easier (with hindsight) to solder the wires that will go from the bulb connectors onto the shorter resistor wires first of all. I used some heat shrink tubes first, completed the soldering, then slid the heat shrink tubes over the join and then used the heat from a match to gently shrink the tubing nicely over the joint and provide insulation.

    Fixing
  16. I used a 10mm spanner to remove the top radiator fixing bolt as shown and attached a bracket, before re-tightening the bolt. Here is the view from where the battery would sit looking towards the front of the car. This bolt provides a perfect location for the resistor, away from everything, with plenty of air to cool it.

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  17. On the driver’s side, there happens to be a spare hole on the side of the subframe. I measured the depth, found a suitable rawplug and shortened it to provide a firm fixing for the resistor as shown. Viewed from the front of the car, looking vertically down the left hand side of the radiator.

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  18. Once you have fixed the resistors in place, you need to replace the bulb holders into the light sockets. Now this is where the patience comes in as they only fit in one way, and only turn approx. 45° or less.

    First, whilst gently holding the LED in place, attach the bulb connector to the pins, ensuring first that the pins are aligned correctly to the pin channels on the connector. These will provide additional grip to secure the LEDs. Check everything is secure before carefully aligning the bulb into the housing.

    They key is the smallest outer lug of the 4, highlighted in cyan below.

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    This lug is smaller than the other 3 and is the one that must be aligned in the bottom, slightly offset recess of the bulb housing. Once this is lined up, you can turn it to lock it in place (refer to point 2 and turn the opposite way depending on your point of view).

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  19. Next, before connecting the wires to the lamp holder wiring, ensure that you route the wires appropriately around or under any other main wiring so they are out of the way.

    Use the electrical bridging connectors to connect each resistor wire to the bulb connector wires. Note that it is a lot easier to do this with the bulb in place, rather than trying to locate and twist the bulb with the wiring blocks in the way, as there is not a lot of length on the bulb connector wires. Make sure they are well clamped using the thin nose pliers
  20. Finally, I cut some tubular trunking to length (which is already slit) and tucked the wires neatly away.
  21. Next, follow the battery / BSI reset procedure for reconnecting the battery. Don’t forget to replace the battery securing clamp, then connect your positive feed first, then the negative.
  22. To test, start the engine, switch the headlights lights on or set to AUTO, then get a cloth and cover the sunlight / rain sensor (make sure you have not activated your auto wipers by pressing down on the wiper stalk). Next wind the window down and turn the wheel to the right and left successively to test the cornering lights work. There should not be any flashing and they should activate when the wheels are turned in either direction.
Here are some pictures of mine. You can see now how close the LED matches the Xenon light.

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Straight ahead with driver’s cornering light on which really lights up the right side:

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Again, the gate on the right by the mirror is really well lit.

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Passenger side from inside the car without the cornering light on:

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And now with the wheel turned and cornering active.

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Here’s a different shot without cornering

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Now you can see far more when it is active.

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I’m really pleased with the outcome and it was well worth the effort.