What a pothole does

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Stickyfinger
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Re: What a pothole does

Post by Stickyfinger »

Jim, who can polish a (bag of) turd :)

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CitroJim
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Re: What a pothole does

Post by CitroJim »

Stickyfinger wrote:
08 Sep 2017, 14:20
Jim, who can polish a (bag of) turd :)


Not me Alasdair! It's not something I throw in my rubbish... I use the standard disposal system for such things...

My neighbours chuck cat's turds in their bin every week and the stink on a Monday morning on collection day is bloody atrocious...

If cats (and dogs) are so bloody clever then why oh why can't they learn to use the loo?

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Re: What a pothole does

Post by Gibbo2286 »

I asked that same question of one of my neighbours Jim, they had three dogs all leaving parcels around their lawn where the kids play and then the kids were expected to do a clean up at the end of the week when dad was about.

I'm sure they could be trained to use a particular corner with a bit of effort.

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Mandrake
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Re: What a pothole does

Post by Mandrake »

CitroJim wrote:
08 Sep 2017, 11:52
Three weeks :shock: That's disgusting Simon...

Surely it is self-defeating as they'll have so much to collect after three weeks they won't be able to cope effectively and the quality of service will fall through the floor and bins will be left uncollected and spills as a result of their rushing trying to keep on top of the job will remain rather than being cleared up.

Effective rubbish collection is a sanitary essential and puts public health at risk if not carried out regularly and effectively. Every three weeks is not regular enough.

Back when I lived in Darwin we enjoyed a twice-weekly bin collection during the night to save disruption and congestion...

Now that was fantastic service but in tropical climes it was essential... Bins would start walking off by themselves after just a day...

It's all in the name of reaching government recycling targets Jim. :roll:

http://www.northlanarkshire.gov.uk/inde ... leid=33247

As well as this change the brown bin that was previously for garden waste only is now for garden waste AND food waste - and they saying that's its perfectly ok to put food waste in it without liners. (yuck!) Problem for us is that it doesn't take much gardening to completely fill the brown bin - I cut the hedge a couple of weeks ago and as we have a fairly long corner hedge only about half of the clippings fit in the bin, the rest are still sitting in a pile for the brown bin to be emptied, but next time it will have to share space with food. (In reality I'll probably just haul it to the dump)

The blue recycling bin (which we have an extra large one of) which previously did plastic and card/paper now only does paper and card - plastic and metal now go in the green bin with the glass. :lol:

Unfortunately our old nemesis - nappies, are not allowed in any of the recycling bins so still have to go in the now tri-weekly general rubbish bin. Oh, and you can apply for a larger general bin, but only if you have 5 (!) people in the household, complete and submit a 7 day "waste diary" to justify why you need it, AND you have not already been provided a larger than usual recycling bin - which we have as the recycling bin was missing when we moved in and that is what they sent us. Great! #-o And now that large blue recycling bin only does paper and cardboard, so we will hardly ever fill it as most of our recycling was glass and plastic, which now have to go in the same normal size green bin.

Of course the recycling bins are emptied every 2 weeks and the general rubbish every 3 weeks as a carrot (stick ?) to make you use recycling as much as possible.

Only politicians trying to meet targets could dream all this up. :twisted:
CitroJim wrote:
08 Sep 2017, 12:08
Gibbo2286 wrote:
08 Sep 2017, 11:54
Should you really be putting nappies in the rubbish bin? I'm told that some councils do a nappy recycling service.

We didn't have the problem, the poo was flushed and the terry nappies washed and reused.

A huge waste of money and resources these throw away things................................worse than diesel smoke for the environment. :-D
Thing is Gibbo, modern nappies are so good their use is well justified for the health of the babe's nether regions... When ours were babies (well over 20 years ago now) we desperately tried to use terries and persevered for months but we went to disposables when the difficulties with nappy rash and the general happiness of our children really dictated their use...
Agreed - modern nappies are amazing, I don't know what they put into the padding but it's unbelievable how effective they are at soaking up liquid and keeping it away from the skin...they can be bulging at the seam and not leak a drop either. I'm 10 years older than my sister and still remember helping change her nappy in the 80's - at first she was in good old fashioned cloth nappies with a safety pin but as you say Jim nappy rash was difficult to avoid, as was it soaking through so she ended up switching to disposables.

I do feel the occasional twinge of guilt when I take nappies out to the bin, but apart from the convenience factor it is genuinely much more hygienic and comfortable for the child - I think Joshua has only had two minor cases of nappy rash in 17 months, which is amazing compared to cloth nappies... it must be a lot more comfortable for him too, and it's rather reassuring that he can run around and play, climb on top of you and sit on you without worrying about a leak that could happen at any time... :lol:

I'm sure there will be those that swear by cloth nappies but I think its just another thing that has had its time - much like washing machines using roller wringers! :-D (And yes, I have used those too...)

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Re: What a pothole does

Post by elma »

Gibbo2286 wrote:
08 Sep 2017, 15:15
I asked that same question of one of my neighbours Jim, they had three dogs all leaving parcels around their lawn where the kids play and then the kids were expected to do a clean up at the end of the week when dad was about.

I'm sure they could be trained to use a particular corner with a bit of effort.

I think it's down to the dogs desires too. My old dog used a patch in the corner as I wished. Kelvin likes to go for a stroll and go in random places, there was no training him otherwise.

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Re: What a pothole does

Post by Gibbo2286 »

We have a black wheelie bin for the non-recycle stuff, a green box for cans and bottles and a blue bag for paper cardboard etc. and another small black box for food waste, they take domestic batteries and small electrical stuff in carrier bags placed on top of the black bin.

For garden waste they supply a green wheelie bin but they make a charge for that of, currently, £30 a year, started at £26 but the inevitable annual increase wasn't long coming along.

I don't subscribe to the garden bin and I never put food waste out, I just don't waste food, I don't buy more than I can use or cook more than I can eat, peelings are composted and scraps of fat are fed to the birds.

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GiveMeABreak
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Re: What a pothole does

Post by GiveMeABreak »

Well might as well chip in here on the bin thread for a comparison!...

West Wales:
Week 1 we have blue bags - ONLY for paper, cardboard, tins, plastic.
Week 2 we have black bags - for everything else but NO gardening waste!
With the above we have a small green food bin that goes out every week regardless - only food waste.

As with Gibbo, we have to pay £40.80 :shock: (so don't be moaning :-D ) for a green wheelie bin (optional scheme) for garden waste that is collected every 2 weeks. The scheme runs from April to November, so it's all mad getting everything cut before the winter!

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CitroJim
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Re: What a pothole does

Post by CitroJim »

We must be lucky then as we get our green bins (for food and garden waste) free and collected weekly...

Ours is simple, just a black bag for non-recyclables, a pink translucent sack for all recyclables except batteries and glass. Glass goes in a blue box (which I share with my neighbour as neither of us have much glass waste) and for batteries we have a small bag which is put with the green bin.

All collected weekly.

I don't waste any food either. Only peelings goes into my green bin as I have no need/space for a compost heap :(

I save a lot of glass jars for future use when making jams and marmalades...

Even waste bread gets turned into my special protein/energy bars using my secret recipe. They're both better and tastier than the commercial energy bars you can buy!

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Re: What a pothole does

Post by Gibbo2286 »

I hope that's not rye bread Jim...........................ergotism :)

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CitroJim
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Re: What a pothole does

Post by CitroJim »

Gibbo2286 wrote:
09 Sep 2017, 09:35
I hope that's not rye bread Jim...........................ergotism :)



No, just my own secret recipe for good old wholemeal seeded wheat bread as developed over many years now Gibbo!

I tried rye once - it was not good... OK for making bricks but not so good for making nice, light edible bread :lol: