Bees and mealworms

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Paul-R
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Post by Paul-R »

Hmm, I ve just looked at this page about local beekeepeing associations http://www.britishbee.org.uk/directory/ ... ociations/ and it doesn't mention either mine (Cheshire) or our neighbour (Lancashire) so I don't know how useful it'll be.
davewithington
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Post by davewithington »

I'm not particularly bothered about the bees

Just want an excuse to walk around in a hat with a veil
HDI Dave
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Post by HDI Dave »

Wow,
If I'd seen that in my workshop I'd be doing a Jim,ie,vamoosing outa there sharpish,and the Xant etc would surely die due to lack of tool access :lol:
Well done Dave on the move,hope they're all happy.
Julz wrote:
MikeT wrote: If you see one walking or just resting, chances are it's out of energy. A feed of something sugary (I'll often use jam) and within a few minutes they'll restart their engines and buzz off. 8-)
That's interesting, I'll bear that in mind next time I see one looking worse for wear.
Uncanny, I found 3 shirts on the washing line this morning,(we'd forgot them :oops: ). Brought them in..and a bee fell out! Looked kind of dead but I still didn't want to pick it up,(can they sting when dead?!).
Anyway, made a brew etc and the bee started moving,very slightly,then looked dead again. Hmm. Shall I hoover it up!! I thought. Right,I'll get some card and a glass and chuck it outside.When I looked round it had walked 3 foot :? Then he buzzed his wings,hopped on the couch,2 minute rest, and nipped out the window into the garden!
Sounds daft but I felt good all day because of that 'dead' bee - (dead lucky) :D
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Citroening
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Post by Citroening »

HDI Dave wrote:Wow,
If I'd seen that in my workshop I'd be doing a Jim,ie,vamoosing outa there sharpish
Me too! :sprint:
Toby_HDi
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Post by Toby_HDi »

Can't stand stinging insects. Stand still they say, don't flap. I just cannot do it, I am incapable of standing there whilst one investigates.

Bees I can understand - I still don't like them - they make honey, pollenate flowers etc and if you leave them bee (sorry!) they'll leave you alone.

Wasps on the other hand, serve no purpose in my eyes and are aggressive. Even unprovoked they'll come at me. I hate them. Pointless creatures.

Scarily, recently I've been seeing a few hornets around here.
brmartyn
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Post by brmartyn »

OMG!!!!!! :eek1: :eek1: :eek1: :eek1: :eek1:
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myglaren
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Post by myglaren »

I have a bees nest in the attic above my bedroom window. As I sit at this computer I can see them reflected in my glasses, entering and leaving via the eaves. They often miss their front door and buzz around in my room for a while.

Eldest daughter found a wasps nest in her shed. Youngest daughter picks it up and lobs it over the fence into the bushes beyond.
Terminally fearless or terminally stupid, not sure which :?
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CitroJim
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Post by CitroJim »

Much as we all hate them Toby, wasps are actually good and useful despite being so aggressive. They are the carrion crows of the inset world and do a lot to get rid of insect-sized roadkill and they eat a tremendous amount of aphids. What I thought was a wasps nest in my garden was in fact loads of wasps descending on my rhubarb that had been infested with black army. They cleared the lot..

Wasps also do a good bit of accidental pollinating. As usual, we'd be a bit lost without them despite us all despising them...

Adam, the redback got me in the foot whilst I was stupidly gardening in just thongs :roll: I felt a little irritation on my foot, scratched it, felt incredibly peculiar, collapsed and woke up in the Royal Darwin strapped to a heart monitor :shock: I was lucky it was a baby one or the outcome might have been worse... Robyn was just two weeks old at the time. NT Redbacks can cause cardiac arrest apparently...

Paul, thanks for bringing back a few beekeeping memories :D

And Dave, thanks a million for starting such an interesting thread :D
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Xaccers
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Post by Xaccers »

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Paul-R
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Post by Paul-R »

Jim

Thanks for reminding us that wasps do serve a purpose. It might be pushing it to call them the gardener's friend but they ARE useful. I've seen them carrying half a caterpillar. They are carnivores and will pick up all sorts of grubs, worms, etc that might otherwise much its way through your roses or veggies.
HDI Dave
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Post by HDI Dave »

CitroJim wrote:Much as we all hate them Toby, wasps are actually good and useful despite being so aggressive. They are the carrion crows of the inset world and do a lot to get rid of insect-sized roadkill and they eat a tremendous amount of aphids. What I thought was a wasps nest in my garden was in fact loads of wasps descending on my rhubarb that had been infested with black army. They cleared the lot..

Wasps also do a good bit of accidental pollinating. As usual, we'd be a bit lost without them despite us all despising them...
:D
Flippin eck Jim, is there nowt you're not clued up on :lol:

I was,like Toby,wondering if wasps had any usefull purpose whatsoever!

We too have aphid infestations,the wife goes nuts,(specially with her roses..)
From now on, I'll have a different,wasp viewpoint. I think I'll agree to live with them,even if they are chav/aggresive insects. Maybe they just need some counselling/understanding :lol:
KP
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Post by KP »

Xac im shocked your posting up pictures from a 'b' movie ;)

Round here i dont see many wasps or bee's but we have loads of hornets which aren't too bad :)
Julz
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Post by Julz »

KP wrote:we have loads of hornets which aren't too bad :)
Unless you get stung by one, now that really does hurt!
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Post by dnsey »

A few years ago, I had a bumblebee nest in the floor of my workshop. Whilst I have nothing against them , they werebecoming something of a nuiscance, so I consulted a beekeeper, who advised me to put a small open jar of petrol near the exit hole. Apparently, while it does them no harm, they hate the smell, and will move - it worked for me, anyway.
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Paul-R
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Post by Paul-R »

dnsey wrote:Apparently, while it does them no harm, they hate the smell, and will move
Mmmmm, they certainly don't like the smell but does them no harm? Well I think I might quibble with that!