Blow by Blow: 1.9TD Clutch Change

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citronut
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Post by citronut »

i i Jim what ave you and jgra1 bin up to then, stiff neck and bad wrist, ooooh la la
regards malcolm

jgra1
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Post by jgra1 »

:shock: now now Malcolm

:twisted:

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CitroJim
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Post by CitroJim »

I can now report a successful outcome and the job is done. I apologise for the delay in posting the "fun" part; getting the gearbox back on :lol: :lol:

But before that, the new clutch has to be installed. It's easy and the only point to note is to carefully align the driven plate and the release bearing. Careful alignment will make the subsequent job of installing the 'box much easier :)

The blue plastic aligment tool that comes with the OE clutch kit is not up to the job at all. You really need a proper tool and I used one that I've had for years. An old imperial one that has a set of different diamater mandrels. None fitted so I had to build them up with insulating tape. Use three mandrels on the alignment tool. One for the flywheel pilot bearing, one for the driven plate and one for the release bearing.

Once all is aligned, torque down the cover evenly to 15 ft lbs. Use a small torque wrench to get it right; you don't want a cover bolt coming loose!

Prepare the gearbox for reinstallation. If not already done, replace the drive shaft oil seals and remove any gear selection rods and the Vehicle Speed Sensor. The former will get in the way and the latter is vulnerable to damage. It is easy enough to refit once the 'box is back in place.

Finally, remove the gearbox drain plug if it is the sort that pokes out of the rear of the differential housing. It can act as a cutting blade agains one of the PAS hydraulic pipes that run across the subframe as you are getting the box back in position.

Make sure the RH driveshaft is well out of the way. Disconnect the track rod end on to ensure you can pully the hub and driveshaft well back. It will get in the way otherwise. The LH driveshaft is best carefuly laid down and out of the way for now.

Position the 'box under the car ready for lifting it in and call on strong help. The next step takes two people.

In the next posting, installing the 'box..

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CitroJim
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Post by CitroJim »

Take a moment to understand how the pull-type release bearing works. You'll see two slots in it that have to engage with the fork on the clutch operating shaft. Set the release bearing in a vertical position with the slots facing toward the front of the car.

Lower the engine as far as it will go and support under the sump with an axle stand. When the lower engine mount is touching the subframe, that is low enough.

To get the 'box within striking distance of the engine, hook a crane onto the rear lifting eye on the gearbox via a "D" shackle. Have an assistant take the weight and carefully lift and guide the 'box upward. The 'box will ony go in one way as space is very tight and made difficult by the subframe abutment and a few haydraulic pipes.

The 'box has to be lifted up with the diff housing near vertical and the tin end of the gearbox tilted upward. Manouevre whilst lifting until the 'box is nearly in position, being careful all the time not to knock the release bearing out of alignment nor damage or strain any hydraulic pipes. A third eye is handy here to observe and shout if anything is about to be damaged. Also take care not to bump the hydraulic pipes that run under the LH chassis leg with the 'box as it moves around.

Whilst still taking the strain on the crane, carefully ease the gearbox input shaft into the release bearing. Carefully level up the box against the engine and then stop. You need to support the 'box from underneath whilst the crane is transferred to the gearbox front lifting eye.

You can now roughly level up the 'box and get it in more-or-less the right position.

With the 'box about two inches away from the engine, carefully engage the forks into the release bearing. If the bearing is not quite in the right position, turn it a little with a long screwdriver until the forks nicely slot in.

With the crane taking the strain, level the 'box in all directions ready for the final push. It can help greatly at this point to use a long bolt that will screw into the middle bellhousing bolt hole to act as a guide. I used a length of studding with a nut on it.

Now have one assistant lay under the car and support the 'box from below. Let a little tension off the crane so the 'box is supported by the assistant underneath. Reaching down, cradle the 'box in your hands and "wobble" and juggle the 'box from side to side, round and round and up and down until it slips home. Have your assistant supporting from below at all times and NEVER allow the weight of the 'box to be taken totally on the gearbox input shaft.

Sounds simple but it's not. You'll do lots and lots of wobbling and juggling and if you're lucky, it'll slot home easily. If you're not it'll take ages with lots of rude words and lost of huffing and puffing. It'll go home eventually though.

If it just won't go, have the gearbox off again and remove the driven plate. Dress the splines with a small triangle file and try again. Lots and lots of failed attempts can slightly damage the very front of the splines and make the job even more difficult. Take great care in aligning the driven plate and release bearing.

When the 'box is home, just check the clutch release fork is still engaged with the release bearing, pop the three bellhousing bolts in and after ensuring the weight is being taken safely, go and have a cup of tea.

The final bits are easy...
Last edited by CitroJim on 15 Mar 2008, 22:20, edited 1 time in total.

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CitroJim
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Post by CitroJim »

If you are still having difficulty getting the gearbox home, read this thread. It contains some wonderfully useful hints and when all of them are used, success is guaranteed. Be sure the RH driveshaft is well out of the way otherwise it can abut against the final drive and make perfect alignment impossible.

http://www.frenchcarforum.co.uk/forum/v ... hp?t=23395

Torque up all four bellhousing bolts, not forgetting the allen headed one low down by the final drive. Replace the lower flywheel cover.

As soon as the 'box is home, attach the gearbox mount and with the crane, pull the gearbox up so the mount shaft goes home in its donut and torque down its top mount nut. You can now remove all support from the engine and gearbox.

Clean and oil the driveshaft ends and slip the LH shaft home first, being careful not to damage the oil seal. You can pop the suspension swivel joint into the wishbone at this point not forgetting to fully torque the nut.

Insert the RH driveshaft, ensuring the intermediate bearing starts its journey into its housing. Carefully engage the intermediate shaft "hockey stick" retainers and do up their nuts evenly, ensuring the intermediate bearing is pulled fully into its housing. It is easy to think it is home when it's not. If it's not fully home, the RH driveshaft will not be properly engaged with the final drive.

Make sure at this point that all front suspension nuts that were disturbed are all correctly tightened.

Replace the speed sensor and pop the drain plug back in. All subsequent work is now carried out from above :)

Replace the clutch operating lever, the clutch cable anchorage framework and the clutch cable. Check the clutch works...

Replace the gear selector rods after cleaning them of old grease and wiping on a thin layer of new grease on the balls.

All that is left now is to replace everything else removed to gain access such as the starter motor, plastic cable tray above the gearbox and reattach the pressure regulator. All this is a straight reversal of disassembly althogh the plastic cable tray can be a bit of a puzzle. I don't recommend leaving it off as a lot of pipes and cables are left unsupported otherwise. Don't forget the connector to the reversing light switch. This can be a bit tricky to get to as it is partially obscured by the clutch operating arm and cable tray.

Refill the gearbox with 75W/80 oil.

Job done, start up, check for hydraulic leaks and enjoy a beautiful, light clutch. You may need to just tweak the adjustment a bit to get the bite point to where you like it.

citronut
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Post by citronut »

sounds like you had lots of fun Jim,

i allways remove both drive shafts completly, and i never use a clutch alighning tool, all i do to line it up is with the presure plate kniped up but still just loose enough to let you move the drive plate around with the tips of your fingers through the three opennings around the sides of the presure plate,

just feel the edge of the drive plate is eaqual on all three sides to the working surface of the presure plate,

this works every time for me,


and as i said earlyer i use an engine/box supporting beam which sitts in the rain chanles on top of the inner wings, and sometimes a little help of a trolly jack, but never an assistant

regards malcolm