405 1.8 Timing belt and general running.

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maddave

405 1.8 Timing belt and general running.

Post by maddave » 06 Oct 2003, 19:17

My cars at 73,000 miles and it hasn't had the timing belt replaced in, I dont think, its entire trouble free life. In Haynes it says I should use a special tool to set the tension and if I dont have one I should go to a dealer to get it measured after replacement. Firstly, is the timing belt an easy enough job to do? Im quite mechanically minded but realise this is a serious job that cant be screwed up. Secondly, do I have to get the tension set at a dealer? - it seems a bit silly doing it then paying someone to check it?
Thirdly, the car is starting to get really "tappy". I know peugeots seem to all sound like deisels but mine is sounding more deisel than ever!! I have just given it a service but should I check the valve clearences and is <i>this</i> and easy enough job too? Im put off by having to get micrometers and do fiddle things!!!
Any help on these subjects would be very useful!

CITMAN
Posts: 407
Joined: 02 Aug 2002, 00:22

405 1.8 Timing belt and general running.

Post by CITMAN » 07 Oct 2003, 01:53

THE VALVE GEAR CAN GET NOISY WHEN THE CAMBELT IS COMING TO THE END OF ITS LIFE I.E. ITS STRETCHED A LOT. AND IF YOUR 405 IS ONE OF LATER ONES THE CAMBELT NEEDS TO BE CHANGED AT 72000 MILES SO YOUR WILL BE 1000 OVER. EARLY ONES ARE 48000 MILES. IF I WERE YOU ID GET IT DONE ASAP BEFORE THE ENGINE GOES POP WHEN IT BREAKS.

alan s
RIP 2010
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Joined: 26 Jan 2001, 16:53
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405 1.8 Timing belt and general running.

Post by alan s » 07 Oct 2003, 06:49

Dave,
As I don't own a diesel, I can only give you some idea as it relates to a 16V BX motor which is possibly the most sensitive engine in the range as regards cambelts.
For years we were all led to believe that to do a cambelt without the magical mystical belt tension checker was flirting with disaster. The result was that it reached the stage that some dealers were charging 300 pounds to do the entire job and 180 to do a check after the owner had. Quite a money spinner!!
Upon doing a series of investigations through various owners/enthusiasts, it was found that (a) Most dealers did not have the checker (in one case they didn't even own a compression tester) (b) Those who did, didn't know how to use it or it was broken & unuseable. (c) We discovered the only accurate way to use it was with the engine <b>out of the car</b> (d) It was also found that the manufacturers instructions stated that one tensioner had to be set at it's <i>maximum tension position</i> and then went on to say that in many instances, this meant that the recommended tension would not be achieved. (e) Common workshop practice (in workshops equipped with the tension checker) was to tension until the readings as recommended were achieved, at which point the twist test as mentioned in Haynes was done; if the belt then twisted too far, the adjusters were then tightened so as to achieve the required twist as specified thereby rendering the reading taken null & void.
Each engine seems to have a set of checks to use to be sure the valve timing is spot on. In the case of a 16V it's 2 stepped pins in the cams & one in the crank @ TDC.
Anders favours the using whiteout to mark teeth & cogs & then doing a tooth count and I personally use both the above systems.
Another is to run a Stanley knife laterally along the old belt then remove the nearest half. Fit the new belt partially on the cogs & when you're sure it's right, cut the remainder of the old belt off & recheck the tension. Any or all of these will work on a 16V so doubtless similar things apply to your motor. Main thing is that the valve timing has to be spot on; one tooth out can cause a disaster, but as regards tension a twist of about 45 degrees on the longest run seems to be the norm.
One thing we did discover on the 16V engines which is worthy of note was that the tensioners <b>HAVE</b> to be adjusted in an <u>anti clockwise direction!</u>
If you check the points as regards tensioner direction for adjustment & checking points for the belt I can't see you having any problems. You make your own decision as to whether you feel competant to handle it. First one's always the worst.[B)] The job on a 16V is about 2 1/2 hours.
Alan S